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Connect with me!                                                      © 2019 Suzanne Slade

Events & Workshops
Fast Facts

 

Pet 

Cutest dog in the world (Corduroy)

 

Hobbies 

Bicycling, rollerblading, baking, and walking my dog

College Degree 

Mechanical Engineering

Media 

TV Interview

Newspaper Article 

Library Podcast Interview

Blog

Picture Book Builders Blog

with Jill Esbaum, Pat Zietlow Miller,

Tammy Sauer, Linda Ashman, Jennifer Black Reinhardt,

Kevan Atteberry, and Mike Boldt.

 
  Favorite Libraries

 

My hometown Cook Library!

 

 

 

 

Little Free Library - Walnut, CA

 

 

 

Pequot Library - Southport, CT

Displayed the creation of FRIENDS FOR FREEDOM including drafts, revisions, sketches, and final art!

 

 

 

 

 

Normal Public Library - Normal, IL

Display showing how THE INVENTOR'S SECRET was created.

       Questions & Answers

How do you learn about the people/events in your books?  

 

         Research is the most exciting and challenging part of my job. While researching a new

  project, I read books (mostly primary sources), visit museums/historic sites, and interview experts.

The research for Countdown: 2979 Day to the Moon took about 8 years. Although I'd worked on rockets during my engineering career, I still had a lot to learn. I interviewed the 4th man on the moon, Alan Bean, studied real moon rocks, read NASA transcripts, watched old newscasts, worked with NASA experts, examined spacecraft, spacesuits, and more!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For The Inventor's Secret, I talked with museum curators, studied invention patents, worked with

   a PhD Edison expert, and visited Thomas Edison & Henry Ford's homes in Florida.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While writing Dangerous Jane I visited Chicago's Hull House and interviewed the curator, read Jane Addams' handwritten diary, examined her Nobel Peace Prize, and studied the FBI's file on this "Most Dangerous Woman in America." I also read many books Jane wrote. 

                      How are the illustrators for your books selected? 

Editors and Art Directors at publishing houses usually select the perfect illustrator for each book, though they often ask authors for ideas. For example ...

Calkins Creek selected the creative & musical Stacy Innerst to illustrate The Music in George's Head.

Little, Brown invited the talented Veronica Miller Jamison to illustrate A Computer Called Katherine. She did a lot of research to create her gorgeous and scientifically accurate illustrations.

 

 

 

Jennifer Black Reinhardt was the fabulous illustrator selected for The Inventor's Secret. Her extensive research and detailed paintings share exciting inventions and science in a fun, easy-to-understand way.

 

 

 

How did you become an author? 

 

My writing journey began in first grade

with this first story. Though it was sloppy

(and had 22 misspelled words,) my teacher 

Miss Hudson said it was "absolutely terrific"

and gave it two stars and a smiley face.

                                                                            In 4th grade my teacher asked each

                                                                            student to write to his/her favorite author.

                                                                            I wrote to Beverly Cleary and she sent back

                                                                            a letter with a handwritten note. I learned

                                                                            authors are real people and very nice.

                    In grade school, my family took a trip.

                        I wrote about the places we visited

                                and drew pictures in a journal.

                                                It was my first book!

                                                           In college I studied engineering.

                                                           After graduation, I worked on car brakes and 

                                                           Delta and Titan rockets. Working in engineering

                                                           was exciting!

 

 

 

Years later my husband and I went to Paris, France

for work. Soon, we got a phone call that a special baby

had been born in the U.S. So we flew home and adopted

our daughter. A year later I had our son.

As I read piles of picture books to my children

I decided to try writing children's books. 

It took over 8 years and 80 rejection

letters before my first book was published.

I hope to keep writing books for a long time!